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OOIOO

OOIOO

Religious Girls, Pusser's Phin

Sun, December 6, 2015

Doors: 7:30 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$18 ADV - $20 DOOR

Tickets Available at the Door

This event is 21 and over

OOIOO
OOIOO
OOIOO has always created a musical language all its own. Under the leadership of Yoshimi P-We, also a founding member of Boredoms, the group has recorded six albums that have subverted expectations and warped perceptions of what constitutes pop and experimental music. Four years of work went into to making Gamel, their bold new album inspired by the Javanese style of gamelan and the first new music from Yoshimi in over five years. Gamelan is an ancient form that has inspired a great many composers and musicians over the past century, from Erik Satie and Claude Debussy to Mouse on Mars and Sun City Girls. The introduction of this traditional form transformed the group into a super tribe, side-stepping the road between the past and the future. Their focus is not to replicate these ancient styles, but to incorporate them into their consistently inventive, constantly shifting musical frameworks. They take their love of indigenous music into an entirely new dimension by freely weaving organic and electric tones into a vivid tapestry, employing their keen sense of color and texture.

While previous OOIOO albums have been largely studio creations, Gamel is the most accurate portrayal of the band’s overwhelming, forceful live presence they have released yet. Yoshimi leads her minimalistic rhythm ensemble by making quick, impulsive shifts in tone and attack, the group acting as one mind under her expert instruction. While the gamelan elements will be brand new to many listeners, the band offsets the bizarre with familiar, at times even nostalgic and childlike, melodies. Gamel is euphoric, bursting at the seams with an exhilarating frenzy that is universal yet uniquely their own. OOIOO’s music is reflected in the ear of the beholder, with each listener taking away something different.

Yoshimi began her music career in 1986 playing drums in UFO or Die with vocalist Eye, and later joined him in the revolutionary noise-pop group Boredoms. Her explosive drum performances captivated audiences and even inspired Wayne Coyne to name a now-famous Flaming Lips album in her honor. While the band’s tours of the United States are infrequent, they are as the New York Times has stated, transcendent.
Religious Girls
Religious Girls
Religious Girls are a diverse group of multi-instrumentalists, with each member hailing from separate musical backgrounds that ranges from metal to noise to math rock and pop. Using their talents, Religious Girls focus thier energy into creating beautiful harmonies and layering them over intricate percussive ryhthms. Preferring to play on the floor near listeners rather than a distant stage, they feel that no matter how high of quality a recording may be the live set is what moves people, and therefore focus on creating intimacy with the crowd. Collectively, the band has tried to push aside the standards of popular song writing with non-repeating structures, an intricate mathmatical style, and a carefully laid out set in which all songs are interweaved into one. Religious Girls offers an intense and dramatic set, leaving viewers in awe by the end of the performance.

Oakland quartet that could be the Bay's own Animal Collective. "As they began their set, my whole perception of noise and music was completely blown out of the water. Religious Girls took the rhythmic pounding of HEALTH and the tropical loveliness of High Places and made it their own, a completely new sound that was as beautiful as it was harsh and brutal. ... The manipulated vocals through the microphones and the call and response keyboard and drum melodies amazed me and captivated me in the best way. They were absolutely fucking terrific." --KEXP Blog
Pusser's Phin
Pusser’s Phin is a spin-off of Southeast-Asia-by-way-of-Oakland’s Neung Phak, who have been beguiling audiences as both Neung Phak and Mono Pause for 23 years. Pusser’s Phin focuses on the Thai regional music style “morlam” for instrumentation and inspiration, utilizing both traditional and modern instruments to spin swirlingly psychedelic minimalist grooves into free-flowing improv fluid leakage.
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