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Baths

Baths

No Joy, Rebecca Schiffman

Sat, May 5, 2018

Doors: 8:30 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$22 ADV - $25 DOOR

This event is 21 and over

8 ticket limit per customer/household, account, email, address, credit card. Orders will be verified for adherence to the 4 ticket limit. Orders placed for the purpose of resale will be cancelled.

Baths
Baths
For mercurial L.A. music-maker Will Wiesenfeld, Baths has been a long time coming. The 21-year-old has spent the better part of his days living amidst “pleasant” and “unremarkable” in the suburbs of the San Fernando Valley, so perhaps it’s due to a general lack of local inspiration that Wiesenfeld’s own work has never fit into a prefab box of its own. Over the last six years, under the handle of [Post-Foetus], Wiesenfeld has gainfully explored the intersections and outer reaches of both electronic and acoustic music. With Baths, his eclecticism finds its greatest focus yet, in a hail of lush melodies, ghostly choirs, playful instrumentation and stuttering beats.

Wiesenfeld’s trip began at age 4, when he willed his parents into enrolling him in piano lessons. (The family upright, purchased that same year, sits in his bedroom today.) By 13, he’d begun artisting his own music using Digital Performer and a MIDI keyboard – a brief, ill-advised foray into Eurobeat that was set right when Wiesenfeld heard Bjork for the first time. Mind blown, he quickly boned up on viola, contrabass, and guitar and took the name [Post-Foetus], stringing together countless live configurations to execute his increasingly inimitable compositions. [Post-Foetus]’ fourth album – a Dntel-ish, song-based melange dubbed The Fabric – was released on Mu-Nest in January.

Though Baths represents the next evolution in Wiesenfeld’s oeuvre – which also includes the excellent ambient project Geotic – it came together under nigh-opposite circumstances. Last September, [Post-Foetus] was invited by L.A. electronicist Daedelus to share a bill with a handful of local Beat Music luminaries. Witnessing a burgeoning movement firsthand sparked something in Wiesenfeld that the ‘burbs never could. In a fit of inspiration, Baths was born, though not into a preexisting scene. As is to be expected, this music goes its own way: fueled by spontaneity, tempered by Wiesenfeld’s background in classic songwriting. Those two influences collide in glorious ways on Cerulean, Baths’ stunning debut.
No Joy
No Joy

We could say a lot of things about the debut album from Montreal/LA ladies No Joy: that it fully delivers on the promise of their Mexican Summer 7", that it builds upon the revitalization of shoegaze pop in recent times with a melodic fervor and angst that many of their contemporaries fail to capitalize on, that their records look and sound gorgeous, that there are moments on Ghost Blonde that match the challenges laid down by My Bloody Valentine and Lush years ago. We could say those things, but then what would the bloggers think? Probably the same. Oh well. We said it. Killer record from a band to be reckoned with. Ten new songs that'll singe your eyelashes off. -Mexican Summer
Rebecca Schiffman
"[Rebecca Schiffman’s third album] closes with an extremely good rendition of Robyn Hitchcock’s “I’m Only You” – but that is far from the only reason to check out Rebecca Schiffman’s self-titled LP. Produced by Money Mark (yes, that Money Mark) and featuring guest spots from Nels Cline ... (among others), it’s a collection of winning indie-folk centered around Schiffman’s singular vocal stylings and imaginative lyrics. Each tune is weird and wonderful, as the songwriter traverses landscapes both real and imagined (not unlike the aforementioned Mr. Hitchcock, come to think of it). The music itself is just right, both familiar and surprising all at once."

- Tyler Wilcox, Doom and Gloom From the Tomb
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