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Mission of Burma

KALX presents

Mission of Burma

Coo Coo Birds, Broncho

Fri, August 29, 2014

Doors: 8:30 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

$20.00

Tickets Available at the Door

This event is 21 and over

Mission of Burma
Mission of Burma
From the outset, ‘Unsound’ was not going to be like any other Mission of Burma album. As expected, the material is raw, primal and aggressive. They still have a signature knack for twisting even the most ferocious noise into complex structures. There are, of course, those killer hooks scattered throughout, but just not quite where you would expect. Yet with all three lead members resolutely making the decision to deliberately stretch their boundaries even further, they stepped out of their comfort zone to create their most rewarding, bewildering and multifaceted long-player yet. With a new label home, ‘Unsound’ will be released on Fire Records in July.

‘Unsound’ is Mission of Burma’s fifth studio album, continuing their remarkable legacy. It seems redundant now to even call it a comeback because they’re a dynamic, current band. Originally together just four years, from 1979-83, Mission of Burma reformed in 2002 for a handful of shows…which let to more concerts, then more, and eventually the release of 2004′s “ONoffON”, their first new recording in over twenty years. But no one expected them to just keep putting out records, let alone records that were every bit as vital and influential as their seminal early recordings. Their first album ‘Vs’ is down in the annals of time as being one of the most important post-punk records ever. Their subsequent recordings: “ONoffON”, “The Obliterati”, “The Sound, The Speed, The Light”, and now, “Unsound”, continue to grow in scope, depth and accomplishment with every step.

On “Unsound” we see Mission of Burma messing with their comfort zone by recording in their Boston rehearsal space which doubles as a recording studio: Analog Divide. As usual, Roger Miller (guitar, vocals), Clint Conley (bass, vocals) and Peter Prescott (drums, vocals) share the songwriting credits with their distinct styles. All of them tried their hand at other instruments and sounds, allowing them to take risks with their creativity and giving them a more fluid line-up. Of course, regular fourth member Bob Weston (of Shellac) was on hand to provide the tape loops and production duties.

As part of the manifesto to stretch musical boundaries, Roger wrote two of his songs (“Opener” and “ADD in Unison”) on the bass rather than guitar. Another (“Dust Devil”) was based on an acoustic guitar improvisation. Both Clint and Peter also tweaked their writing just enough to make them feel it was actually worthwhile making another record. They also decided to use trumpet on the record, so Bob pulled out his trumpet playing skills to oblige. Peter Prescott describes the experience: “We are a four headed hydra trying to create unity without canceling or censoring each head. So we juggle melody, groove, noise, depression, disruption, ecstasy… tension, release. I guess it’s thrilling for us to walk that musical tightrope.”

Clint Conley describes being in the studio: “There were certain technological advances, as well, that might have been unthinkable just a few short years ago, in a distant time and century. During the mix at Woolly Mammoth, Peter occasionally opted for a virtual presence. From time to time a hologram of his head would appear, hovering in a darkened corner, issuing directives and encouragement. Not to say there weren’t occasional glitches in the system. For a few days the hologram seemed locked in a mystifying loop, calling for more cymbals, regardless of whether the band were working on a mix or ordering Vietnamese food.”

The results are spectacularly successful. With ‘Unsound’, Mission of Burma has achieved its goal of making something utterly unique and stretching the realms of musical possibility. Mission of Burma’s curiosity and creativity remain undiminished. The graph just keeps rising…the boundaries breaking…and the ears ringing. Long may it continue.
Coo Coo Birds
"Hold Onto Your Girlfriends, the Coo Coo Birds Have Arrived. The Coo Coo Birds embody timeless rock ‘n’ roll attitude, with their era-spanning sound drawing from garage, psychedelic, and 50′s rock, all created in the old convent in San Francisco where the band resides. Band Name: Coo Coo Birds Hometown: San Francisco Born Date: Jan 2012 Sounds Like: Boiler Pot Rock n’ Roll at its best. The 1950′s got a new skate board, then fell off when 1967 tripped him. Then 1977 came along and beat them both up for it, and all three were arrested by Officer 2012. Fun Fact: The band lives in an ex-Convent turned artist community, and derives much of their inspiration from this unique SF scene. " — Katie Kopacz, Sf Station
Broncho
Broncho
It makes sense then, that BRONCHO, born out of out a film project, its initial incarnation sparked when founder Ryan Lindsey was asked to create music, “to set to an early 80s punk film.” “That’s all I knew about it,” he remembers, “they were looking for songs that touched this era. And songs kept coming to me and turned something on inside of me artistically.” Lindsey found himself in the midst of prolific run of songs and he liked the idea “of starting out there and seeing where it could go.”

What’s evolved from those first tracks there has been a steady run of success, critical accolades and two full-length albums; 2011’s Can't Get Past the Lips, 2014’s Just Enough Hip to Be Woman. And beneath it all – the music has been constantly mutating and ceaselessly experimental. From that first inception as a soundtrack in 2010, BRONCHO has taken on a life of its' own – initial inspiration still there, but now pushing far beyond the stiff confines of score. And what began as an ode to ramshackle, high-energy early punk has become something deeper, weirder, and much more nuanced. The undercurrent of early 1980 punk is still there, but The Ramones pogo has been replaced more often by a kind of Love and Rockets inspired, honeyed, cotton-mouthed drift.

Double Vanity is Lindsey and band mates Ben King, Nathan Price and Penny Pitchlynn steadily moving ahead, transforming the raw angst of the first record into a sound decidedly more layered and complex. Tracks like “New Karma" or “Two Step" riff off the later explorations of punk, culling up refracted images of John Hughes prom nights, love songs echoing from a boom box held high. "Jenny Loves Jenae" and "Speed Demon" strut with an when 80s met 50s swagger, discord transformed into a jagged, frenetic pop. "Señora Borealis" is all bad boy sneer - sensual, moody, with a sly and predatory swagger. "I Know You" is simultaneously infectious and brooding, somehow both exalting and heartsick.

The result is a record that veers gleefully from BRONCHO’s roots, moving from graffiti spray backrooms into a sleeker, plusher sound, a place bright with the polished gleam of chrome and bleached white sunlight. Close your eyes and what you feel is the raw wound pulse of adolescence, what you see behind your lids is suburban shopping mall wastelands, glazed eyes, dead grass, lips glossed in bubblegum pink. There is the burst chest thump of teenage longing, the smell of hairspray and cigarette. There is glow of neon and the glint of streetlight rolling across hood.

Double Vanity evokes a shared nostalgia, for the past and for the unknown future, as BRONCHO takes a turn off the wide freeways and into a world of intimate, intricate - but always universal - emotion.
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