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Art Brut, Tapes 'n Tapes

Art Brut

Tapes 'n Tapes

The Chain Gang of 1974

Fri, Aug 26, 2011

Doors: 8:30 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

Tickets at the Door

This event is 21 and over

Art Brut
Art Brut

The confident and confrontational Art Brut return with their new studio album "Brilliant Tragic!" on May 23rd. The first single "Lost Weekend" is released the week before on May 16th.

Again produced by Black Francis but unlike its predessesor "Art Brut vs Satan", which was recorded in under two weeks, Brilliant Tragic's writing process was a lot more intense than usual, as Eddie Argos explains "with the last album we met up every couple of months and wrote three or four songs. This time we got together in the second half of the year and wrote whenever we could 2 or 3 times a week. We had more time in the studio this time too (about a week more) so Black Francis had time to teach me how to sing." and "I'm very proud that I sing on it. Only took four albums to start singing, not bad."

Tuneful and truculent Art Bruts albums have always gone for straight forward titles "Bang Bang Rock And Roll" did what it said on the tin, "Its a Bit Complicated" was a bit complicated, On "Art Brut VS Satan" we had a fight with Satan. This one follows the same pattern it is a Brilliant! Tragic! record. If it was a TV show you'd define it as a Dramedy." When asked how Brilliant Tragic differs from previous opus' the eradite Eddie Argos explains "Well I sing on this one, Ian has a new pedal, Fred sings backing vocals for the first time and we let Jasper play a guitar solo (only on two strings though). Also, with the writing for the last album I really enjoyed writing about Mundane things trying to make them exciting. There were songs about riding buses, summer jobs and having songs trapped in your head. This time the album is more about how I think I'm psychic, songs for my funeral, the principality of Sealand and Axl Rose. Weightier topics I think. I'm also sexier now"....." Also with the last album we'd just remembered we were a punk band again so it was all four to the floor rock out. This time there are a few songs to let you catch your breath so when we do rock the fuck out again it hits home harder."

"Brilliant Tragic!" exceptional artwork has been created by Jamie McKelvie, a comics creator best known for his work on Phonogram: Rue Britannia. The artwork is unveiled at the bottom of this press release.

Art Brut have also linked up with PledgeMusic to offer fans an exclusive download and extras with "Brilliant Tragic!". An exclusive new track "Unprofessional Wrestling" is available now as a free download on www.pledgemusic.com/artists/artbrut/widgets/972

While the extras available for fans via PledgeMusic include signed screen prints of the album artwork, exclusive t-shirts, Art Brut Karaoke with Eddie, plus an opportunity for fans to have Art Brut perform at their very own party. Also, anyone purchasing "Brilliant Tragic!" through PledgeMusic will be helping UNICEF Art Brut's nominated charity. Full details on the Art Brut bundles can be found at www.pledgemusic.com/projects/artbrut

To celebrate the release of "Brilliant Tragic!" Art Brut will be taking up residency at Lexington in London starting on Monday May 30th and finishing 5 nights later on Friday June 3rd.

Art Bruts plans for the band for 2011 are "same as always, tour everywhere we possibly can, rock out, write songs."
Tapes 'n Tapes
Tapes 'n Tapes

Tapes ‘n Tapes is a rock band from Minneapolis, MN, made up of Josh Grier on guitar and lead vocals, Matt Kretzmann on keys and horns, Erik Appelwick on bass guitar and backing vocals, and Jeremy Hanson on percussion.
Grier said he formed the band in 2003, to “have fun with my friends. I always wanted to see if I could play music with others and for others.” Grier and his buddies amassed “tapes ‘n tapes” of noodling, experimental jams and declared themselves officially a band.
In the winter of 2004, the band now known as Tapes ‘n Tapes bought some recording equipment and headed out to a rustic cabin in the woods of Wisconsin. They recorded their self-titled, now long out of print, seven song EP in three days. Songs like “Beach Girls” and “50’s Parking” from the EP are still in their live set today.
Next up for the band was recording their critically acclaimed follow up, The Loon. Appelwick recorded, mixed and produced the eleven song record with the band in one week at a friend’s home studio. The Loon came out in November of 2005 on ibid records, and no one was ready for what came next. People started to notice the foursome’s jangly, melodic brand of rock and the band started touring – gaining more and more attention from music critics and fans all over the world. Even the Thin White Duke took notice. “’Insistor’ is the first single, and it's cracking. It was a slow grower, but once that chorus digs in there's really no escape,” said Mr. David Bowie. The prestigious XL Recordings re-released The Loon in July of 2006, the same month Tapes ‘n Tapes made their national television debut on the Late Show with David Letterman.
The band then toured around the world for the next few years- playing shows with the likes of Franz Ferdinand, Spoon, Cold War Kids, The Black Keys, Echo & the Bunnymen, and The Wrens. In 2006 they were honored to play Reading/Leeds, and 2007 saw them rock out at Lollapalooza and Coachella.
When starting to work out songs for their follow up, Walk It Off, the band was asked who their dream producer was. The obvious answer to them was Mr. Dave Fridmann (Flaming Lips, MGMT). With twelve songs in hand, the band made the jaunt to upstate New York to live and work with Fridmann for two amazing weeks- one week in September 2007 to record and one week in October 2007 to mix. However, years of touring, the political climate, and distance from friends and family had changed the band, and given them a different point of view- one that seemed to pervade their sound. Spin praised the record saying, “the tunes are tighter and performances far more dynamic and aggressive…..they can now pull off jittery punk and understated, graceful melancholy.” XL released Walk It Off in April of 2008, on the same day the band made their debut on Conan O’Brien.
After touring and supporting Walk It Off for the following year, it was time for a little R & R- rest and relaxation. They purposefully took their time and tried to get back to a place where the band was fun, and not work. They also decided to go back to their roots and do everything on their own, with no label involvement. They cut ties with XL, and re-launched ibid records, their own label which initially released The Loon. The brothers tapes had saved their pennies over the years and set out to make the record they’ve always wanted to make – Outside. They wanted to record at home and self-produce, which they did over two weeks at The Terrarium in Minneapolis, MN in March of 2010. The next step was getting the talented Mr. Peter Katis (Interpol, The National) to lend his ears to the mix. Grier spent two more weeks in Bridgeport, CT, while Katis mixed the record to perfection. The result is twelve songs that are playful and melodic, while also capturing the essence and energy of their live show. Grier said, “We had a great time making Outside and we wanted our enjoyment of the process to be audible in the recording, and I think we succeeded.” One thing is for sure, Tapes ‘n Tapes feel like they are making music for the right reasons – fun and pure love for music. And as Grier always says, “Everything else is gravy.” Outside will be released on January 11, 2011.


Tapes ‘n Tapes is set to release their new album – Outside – through their own label, ibid records, the original home to the band’s breakthrough album, The Loon. Outside was recorded at The Terrarium in their hometown of Minneapolis by their long time sound engineer, Drew Malamud. After recording for two weeks, they handed the record off to Peter Katis (Interpol, The National) to lend his signature sound to the mix.
The result is twelve songs that are playful and melodic, while also capturing the essence and energy of their live show. Outside sounds refined and lush, letting the memorable melodies shine. The songs are more straightforward allowing each member’s personality to emerge. Outside is the perfect mix of their previous works, with a whole new clarity of sound. The first single, “Freak Out,” is a fast-paced romp with a shout-along chorus that is sure to delight fans both new and old. The album’s opener, “Badaboom,” showcases longing vocals with a driving rhythm that propels the song into an epic rock breakdown. “Nightfall’s” seemingly disparate parts are woven together into a beautifully strange break-up ballad. The haunting horns and sparse guitars unite for one of Tapes ‘n Tapes biggest songs yet. “One In The World” is a danceable, jangly number about a search for love that takes you around the globe. The twelve songs on Outside are unified by themes of longing and loneliness, and the journey of finding and losing love. There is a newfound space in Tapes ‘n Tapes sound that is both intimate and distant at the same time. Combine that with a pervasive sense of joy throughout the whole record and what you hear is a band making music that they truly love.
The Chain Gang of 1974
The Chain Gang of 1974
"My brothers and I were surrounded by music growing up," explains Kamtin Mohager, the shape-shifting singer/multi-instrumentalist behind the Chain Gang of 1974. "Not Beatles albums or anything like that; more like the Persian records our parents played all the time. And when we got older, it was up to us to discover everything." Born in San Jose and raised in Hawaii, Mohager spent his first 13 years obsessing over inline hockey and the idea of being drafted by the NHL one day. A series of life-changing events were set in motion once Mohager's family moved to Colorado, however. The first of which involved the final scene from Real Genius—quite possibly Val Kilmer's finest hour—and its penultimate ‘popcorn song', a.k.a. "Everybody Rules the World." "I love ‘80s music, but not typical new-wave stuff," says Mohager. "Like I'm way into Tears For Fears and Talk Talk, the other side of the spectrum, really." That's abundantly clear on White Guts, a record that's nearly as restless as Chain Gang's previous collection of early recordings, Fantastic Nostalgic. The way Mohager sees it, his first proper release was "all over the place, from a piano ballad to songs that sound like Black Rebel Motorcycle Club, Primal Scream or Justice." White Guts, on the other hand, funnels three years of instrument-swapping, sample-splicing experience into a lean, focused listen. So while "Stop!" and the rather epic "Hold On" hint at everything from LCD Soundsystem to Talking Heads, they make perfect sense in the context of deep cuts like the synth-flecked "Don't Walk Away" and bass-guided "Matter of Time," shimmering power ballads that could have been on the soundtrack of Sixteen Candles or Pretty in Pink. What sets the Chain Gang of 1974 apart from other Reagan-era revivalists is Mohager's innate sense of rhythm, a skill he acquired at an early age. And we're not just talking about his parents' punchy, groove-riding record collection. We're talking about family gatherings and traditions that taught Mohager how to make a crowd of cool kids uncross their arms and dance like there's pistols pointed at their feet. "Everyone lets loose at our shows," says Mohager. "It's a party, man. If only I had a dollar for every time someone bum-rushed the stage or grabbed one of our instruments." Things are bound to get worse, too, as his live band—a quartet that's a far cry from Mohager's original iPod/bass setup—spends the next six months spreading the Chain Gang gospel far beyond its Rocky Mountain beginnings. Or as the man behind every last beat puts it, "I'm letting the music just be, and if something's meant to happen, it's meant to happen."
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